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Aesthetic and Ethical Transformations
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This volume explores and expands a Wittgensteinian account of philosophy as an ongoing practice and exercise. It investigates the simultaneously aesthetic and ethical dimension of philosophical exercises, so as to uncover their transformative potential for and within ordinary practice, conceived of as a weave of trained, embodied habits. For this purpose, the volume focuses on three intertwined aspects:
1. It examines the aesthetic form of Wittgenstein’s texts, so as to consider the use of pictures, comparisons, and instructions as exercises to be enacted by readers, and further analyzes the transformative effects – both aesthetic and ethical – that such exercises bring out.
2. It draws a number of connections between Wittgenstein’s philosophical exercises and particular aesthetic practices.
3. It sheds light on continuities and discontinuities between Wittgenstein’s account of philosophy and the ancient conception of philosophy as an exercise and a way of life.
Cultural Representations of Housing across Media
Few ideas are as universally key, basic and primal as “home”. Few ideas require more attention and new, critical re-examination in recognition of ongoing social change. In the post-pandemic and ecological reflection on how we live and approach “home” in its diverse definitions, engagement with this topic is only bound to grow in the future. This rapidly rising interest in the multidisciplinary field of housing studies is reflected also by our collection, which can be seen as an introduction to the entire research area thanks to the opening chapter, outlining its history and complexity. The following chapters by an international group of scholars representing different generations and methodological approaches examine some of the many meanings of home, houses or housing as they have been expressed in Western culture, not only across time but also across varied media: from traditional and digital theatre, through varied literary genres, to film and television, photography and street art.
Virtuelle Architekturen interdisziplinär
Der Band fokussiert virtuelle Architekturen als bildhafte Räume und begehbare Bilder und lotet damit sowohl ihre ästhetischen als auch performativ-praktischen Potenziale aus.
Virtuelle Räume bestimmen unsere Kultur heute bereits mehr, als uns bewusst ist. Wir betreten sie sowohl zur Unterhaltung, beim Spielen und Lernen, als auch in der Architektur und in industriellen Arbeitsprozessen. Inzwischen nehmen sie in der Forschung ebenfalls eine wachsende Rolle ein. Zugleich steht eine kritisch reflektierende Beschäftigung mit der Ästhetik der simulierten Bildräume, den Prämissen ihres Entstehens und den von ihnen ausgehenden Handlungsangeboten noch weitgehend aus. Zwölf Beiträge aus angewandten Bereichen in Forschung und Technik, experimentellen Ansätzen in Architektur, Kunst und Theater sowie aus theoretisch-historischer Perspektive geben erhellende Einblicke in den kulturell und gesellschaftlich zunehmend bedeutsamen Bereich digitaler Raumkonzepte und virtueller Realitäten.
Open Access
Vol. I–Vol. VI
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Bis zum 31.10.2022 gilt der Subskriptionspreis € 998,00 - später: € 1.298.00
Cy Twombly (1928–2011), one of America’s most important artists, inscribed on his works written notes and fragments of poetry, even whole poems, throughout the whole period of his creative activity. The present Catalogue of Inscriptions for the first time collects in six opulent volumes all 901 of Twombly’s written notations, presenting them in transcription and in the context of their 113 different literary sources, and so traces the artist’s lifelong intellectual engagement with poetry and the forms of the scriptural. More than 90% of the decipherment and more than half of the authors quoted by Twombly are first assignments.
Roland Barthes described Cy Twombly’s oeuvre as a “work of writing”. In fact, Twombly’s use of written texts clearly sets him apart from other second generation representatives of the New York School (Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns). Twombly provided around 40% of his pictorial works from 1953 onwards with textual notations and literary quotations from poets from antiquity to the present day, such as Sappho, Praxilla, Rumi, ʿAbbās ibn al-Aḥnaf, Keats, Rilke, Bachmann, Faiz Ahmed Faiz or Patricia Waters. Yet the level of meaning of the handwritten inscriptions remains an element of his pictorial language whose interpretation is still disputed today, since only 19 poets have been cited to date.
On the basis of the publication, the scriptural becomes clearly recognizable for the first time as an equal element in the structure of Cy Twombly’s work and an essential medium of signification in his pictorial world. The introductory volume, drawing on the results of the work of transcription and ascription, analyzes how Twombly’s inscriptional practice developed and how complex constellations of iconotextual references are created between the scriptural and the graphic in his works. Against the background of the conception of poetics of Charles Olson, Twombly’s teacher at Black Mountain College, it becomes evident that in Twombly the scriptural is the principal bearer of “remanence”, the phenomenon that enables a re-enactment, in each present moment of reception, of what is represented. Cy Twombly described this energy force and emotional intensity as “the phenomenon of finding the memory of something that has vanished and left no trace of itself”.
This essay develops a theory of improvisation as practice of aesthetic sense-making. While considering all arts, references are made to many concrete cases. A topic in vogue since the XX. century, as evidenced by the great philosophers who were interested in it (Ryle, Derrida, Eco among others), improvisation, a felicitous mixture of habit and creativity, norm and freedom, is constitutive of human action. Human practices – including very well-regulated activities such as playing chess, piloting airplanes, or medicine – permit and often require it to varying degrees.
Improvisation is also the true source of artistic experience. Consequently, the aesthetics of improvisation result in a philosophy of art: Art was born as improvisation. Yet improvisation has its own aesthetic dimension: that of a "grammar of contingency" in which notions such as emergence, presence, curiosity and authenticity explain the pleasures of joyful adventure and empathic involvement elicited by improvisation.
Classical Theories and New Perspectives
Cultural memory has been a concept for already 30 years. But what is social memory? The topics of memory, remembering and forgetting are meeting with increasing resonance in sociology. This introduction to the sociology of memory is the first to systematically develop some of the basic theories in this field and to provide an overview of the issues and problems involved.
Prolegomena to Ecological Thinking in Heidegger
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Nature as Limit provides an account of Nature in terms of the collapse of the subject-object binary, presenting Heidegger’s work as a series of prolegomena toward a prospective ecological thought. This begins with a critical re-evaluation of the homology Heidegger discovers between the essence of technology and the trajectory of Western metaphysics, with special attention paid to his return to Aristotle’s Physics in 1939. Reimagining technics and our understanding of Nature as ‘technical image’, the book examines Nature as the occurrence of (de)limitation. An uncapturable immanence in the field of total phenomena, Nature is the incompletedness of any naturalism, an understanding that raises strange and compelling questions about space, time, and history. Nature as Limit confronts Heidegger’s use of language on its own terms, exploring the full breadth of its intention and offering a demystification of that language, a reappraisal that offers a new lexicon for future readers.
Approaches to Eric Voegelin’s Political Philosophy
The first volume of this new yearbook focuses on Eric Voegelin’s 1952 paper “New Science of Politics”, its significance and enduring relevance.
Eric Voegelin’s “New Science of Politics” is today considered a classic of recent political philosophy, albeit a controversial one. As soon as it was published, the book caused a sensation, especially because of its relatively sharp criticism of the normative foundations of Western modernity. In doing so, Voegelin places the question of the ambiguity of the concept of representation and its claim to truth at the center of his reflections. The contributions to this volume aim to shed light on how fruitful and topical this perspective still is today from various perspectives. The contributions come from authors of different disciplines, including political science, philosophy, and sociology. In addition to a classification of the “New Science of Politics” in Voegelin’s oeuvre as a whole, the volume primarily inquires into the systematically interesting points of contact, which are also of interest beyond Voegelin’s reception.
Medicine and Writing in the Early Eighteenth Century
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This book explores the impacts, particularly on their writing, of the serious illnesses of Swift and Pope, alongside their respective understandings of health issues and within their period context.
Both Swift and Pope spent most of their lives suffering from serious illness, Ménière’s Disease (Swift) and Pott’s Disease (Pope). This was at a time when medical understanding of these conditions was minimal. This book examines the effects of illness on each writer’s relations with doctors, treatment, and medicine more widely, and how far and in what ways their own experiences affected their writing. The book explains the contemporary medical context and subsequent specialist knowledge of the illnesses, and places each alongside both writers’ attempts to come to terms with their suffering, not least with respect to the different forms and styles of their works. Each writer’s extensive correspondence is drawn on, as well as a range of texts.
Open Access
Forgetting and Forgetfulness in Modern Science
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The book offers a fundamental view on the problem of forgetting in sociology in general and within sociology of knowledge. Furthermore it focuses – as a case study – on the field of modern science. With recourse to the term ‚oblivionism‘, originally introduced with ironic-critical intent by the german romance scholar Harald Weinrich, it analyzes the fundamental and multifaceted problem of the loss of knowledge in the field of science.
A declarative-reflective, an incorporated-practical and an objectified-technical memory motif is at the centre. These form the basis for the development of the three forms of forgetting that are also central to modern science: forgetfulness, wanting to forget and, ultimately, making one forget.
Open Access