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Vol. I–Vol. VI
Author: Thierry Greub
Bis zum 30.06.2022 gilt der Subskriptionspreis € 998,00 - später: € 1.298.00
Cy Twombly (1928–2011), one of America’s most important artists, inscribed on his works written notes and fragments of poetry, even whole poems, throughout the whole period of his creative activity. The present Catalogue of Inscriptions for the first time collects in six opulent volumes all 901 of Twombly’s written notations, presenting them in transcription and in the context of their 113 different literary sources, and so traces the artist’s lifelong intellectual engagement with poetry and the forms of the scriptural. More than 90% of the decipherment and more than half of the authors quoted by Twombly are first assignments.
Roland Barthes described Cy Twombly’s oeuvre as a “work of writing”. In fact, Twombly’s use of written texts clearly sets him apart from other second generation representatives of the New York School (Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns). Twombly provided around 40% of his pictorial works from 1953 onwards with textual notations and literary quotations from poets from antiquity to the present day, such as Sappho, Praxilla, Rumi, ʿAbbās ibn al-Aḥnaf, Keats, Rilke, Bachmann, Faiz Ahmed Faiz or Patricia Waters. Yet the level of meaning of the handwritten inscriptions remains an element of his pictorial language whose interpretation is still disputed today, since only 19 poets have been cited to date.
On the basis of the publication, the scriptural becomes clearly recognizable for the first time as an equal element in the structure of Cy Twombly’s work and an essential medium of signification in his pictorial world. The introductory volume, drawing on the results of the work of transcription and ascription, analyzes how Twombly’s inscriptional practice developed and how complex constellations of iconotextual references are created between the scriptural and the graphic in his works. Against the background of the conception of poetics of Charles Olson, Twombly’s teacher at Black Mountain College, it becomes evident that in Twombly the scriptural is the principal bearer of “remanence”, the phenomenon that enables a re-enactment, in each present moment of reception, of what is represented. Cy Twombly described this energy force and emotional intensity as “the phenomenon of finding the memory of something that has vanished and left no trace of itself”.
Game Studies Interdisziplinär
Der Band präsentiert interdisziplinäre Zugangsweisen zu Games und vereint fachwissenschaftliche und didaktische Perspektiven aus dem Bereich der Kulturwissenschaften. Hierbei werden sowohl Indie-Games wie Path Out, Life is Strange und GRIS als auch Tripple-A-Titel wie Call of Duty, GTA und Legend of Zelda betrachtet. Schwerpunktbereiche des Bandes präsentieren unter anderem die Darstellung von Wissenschaft in Games sowie das Spannungsverhältnis von Bild und Storytelling. Es werden Phänomene wie die Werbestrategien der Bundeswehr, psychische Erkrankungen aber auch aktuelle Themen wie Flucht und Migration sowie ökosensible Kulturkritik erörtert.
Although we tend to suggest that clear constructions of identity are granted to religious symbols under the assumption that they distinguish between self and other explicitly, perceptions of alterity in fact play a vital role in sacral forms of representation. Markers of foreignness are used in a semantics of the exceptional that characterizes the sacral. Perceptions of difference are thus capable of making visible the remoteness of sacral forms from the profane world of experience. This book, therefore, asks: What role do traits of alterity play in the sacral context? How are various concepts of the sacred synthesized in situations of transcultural translation, for instance in the context of missionary activity? How did an artifact arrive at sacral potency in various cultures, and under what conditions did semantic shifts occur?
Social Dimensions of Knowledge Production
By analyzing how artistic and curatorial practices can activate processes and generate structures that facilitate dialogical spaces of communication between curators, artists and their publics, The Curatorial Complex addresses the social dimensions of knowledge production for the ways people and art come together in the curated encounter.
Questions around what knowledge is and how it can be produced are paired with critically addressing in the proliferation of knowledge production as part of the intellectualization of the art field and its commodification in the knowledge economy.
Religion, Art, and Visual Culture in Plural Configurations
Series:  dynamis
What makes an image offensive? — This question is addressed in this volume. It explores tensions and debates about offensive images and performative practices in various settings in and beyond Europe.
Its basic premise is that a deeper understanding of what is at stake in these tensions and debates calls for a multidisciplinary conversation. The authors focus on images that appear to trigger strongly negative reactions; images that are perceived as insulting or offensive; those subject to taboos and restrictions; or those that are condemned as blasphemous. In light of recurrent acts of violence leveled against images and symbols in the contemporary, globally entangled world, addressing instances of “icono-clash” (Bruno Latour) from a new post-secular, global perspective has become a matter of urgency.
Open Access
Narratives, Concepts, and Practices at work, 20th and 21st Centuries
Based on the papers presented at an international conference at the Freie Universität Berlin in 2013, the publication focuses on problems and challenges of art history’s epistemic frameworks. Following four guiding themes – narrations, venues, concepts and practice – the contributions address the aspect of mobility of aesthetic objects and their contextualisation from different analytical perspectives.
The essays examine complex processes of transcultural negotiations that are set in motion by »travelling« objects, artists, ideas and institutions in order to trace and analyse historical conditions that generated specific frameworks with their respective art historical narratives and artistic production.
Topographies of Artistic Mobility in Europe and Asia
While recent scholarship dealt with the economic and political historio-graphies of road systems, this book focuses on routes as stimuli of cultural transfer and artistic production.
Framed in the historiography of longue durée, routes may be addressed as trajectories that cut across cultural geographies and periodizations. With focus on the early modern period, the volume foregrounds an unprecedented expansion and transformation of route-networks. New combinations of transcontinental routes profoundly affected cultural topographies and symbolic paradigms. The rise of Asian and European port cities as nodes of maritime systems and prosperous cultural contact zones is closely linked to these shifts; routes, hubs, and the fabrication of collective imaginations about them therefore constitute the central themes of this book.
Essay on the Artist as Murderer
Why the myth of Daedalus, the protos euretes, is connected with envy and murder? The author takes as his starting point Ovid’s Metamorphoses, where Daedalus’ envy drives him to murder his pupil and nephew Perdix. He also considers the passage of Seneca the Elder, about the painter Parrhasius and the citizen from Olynthus, that he had tortured in order to paint the agony of Prometheus. The first case is a topos of the artist’s biography which implies, that the craft of the artisan was held as a guarded secret; the second is related to mimesis. The author questions what role the topos of the artist as murderer plays in text and imagery, from the Middle Ages to modern literature.