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Author: Clive T. Probyn
What was the relationship between Jonathan Swift, author of Gullivers’s Travels, and his own experience of contemporary Anglo-Irish travel?
This new investigation shows how his family history, his politics, his writing life and also his mysterious relationship with two women were both predetermined by and enabled by geography. The Irish Sea made Swift into a restless and necessary traveller capable of living in the space between an imperial England and a colonised Ireland but never fully at home in any one place.
Papers from The Seventh Münster Symposium on Jonathan Swift
This new volume of Reading Swift assembles 26 lectures delivered at the Seventh Münster Symposium on Jonathan Swift in June 2017, testifying to an extraordinary spectrum of research interests in the Dean of St Patrick’s, Dublin, and his works. Reading Swift follows the tried and tested format of its predecessors, grouping the essays in eight sections: biographical problems; bibliographical and canonical studies; political and religious as well as philosophical, economic, and social issues; poetry; Gulliver’s Travels; and reception studies. The élan vital, which has been such a distinctive feature of Swift scholar-ship in the past thirty-five years, is continuing unabated.
Papers from The Sixth Münster Symposium on Jonathan Swift
Assembling thirty-five lectures delivered at the Sixth Münster Symposium on Jonathan Swift in June 2011, this new volume of Reading Swift testifies to an extraordinary spectrum of research interests in the Dean of St Patrick’s, Dublin, and his works. As in the successful earlier volumes, the essays have been grouped in eight sections: biographical aspects (W. B. Carnochan, John Irwin Fischer, Clive T. Probyn, Abigail Williams); bibliographical and textual studies (Ian Gadd, James E. May); A Tale of a Tub (J. A. Downie, Gregory Lynall and Marcus Walsh, Michael McKeon); historical and religious issues (Christopher J. Fauske, Christopher Fox, Ian Higgins, Ashley Marshall, Nathalie Zimpfer); Irish vistas (Sabine Baltes, Toby Barnard, Andrew Carpenter, D. W. Hayton, James Ward); poetry (Daniel Cook, Kirsten Juhas, Stephen Karian, Dirk F. Passmann and Hermann J. Real, James Woolley); Gulliver’s Travels (Barbara M. Benedict, Allan Ingram, Ann Cline Kelly, Melinda Alliker Rabb); and reception and adaptation (Gabriella Hartvig, Clement Hawes, Heinz-Joachim Müllenbrock, Tim Parnell, Peter Sabor, Nicholas Seager, Howard D. Weinbrot). Clearly, the élan vital, which has been such a distinctive feature of Swift scholarship in the past thirty years, is continuing unabated.
Säkularisation, Kultur und Kapitalismus um 1700
Der Satiriker Ward ließ keine Gelegenheit aus, die Mitglieder des Dissent bloßzustellen. Damit analysierte er das (Webersche) Junktim von Gläubigkeit und kapitalistischer Effizienz korrekt und stellte es an den Pranger. Diese trotz aller sprachlicher Extravaganzen scharfe Beobachtung galt für seine wunderbaren Beiträge in der eigenhändig verfassten Zeitschrift The London Spy (1697-99) ebenso wie in vielen anderen Beschreibungen gesellschaftlicher Charaktere und der Räume, in denen sie aufeinanderprallten. Nicht Addison oder Steele waren die Begründer des periodischen Schrifttums, sondern Autoren wie Ward.