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In: Reading Swift
In: Reading Swift
Author: James E. May

Abstract

This paper examines the varying fullness of Dublin imprints employed by printers during the period 1710-35, identifying printers with particular attention to cut printers’ ornaments, increasingly employed after 1710, typographical practices, and other sorts of evidence helpful in identifying where, when, and by whom books were printed. It reveals that Dublin printers of the period, because they often published what they printed (much more often than did London printers), usually acknowledged their work in imprints. It assesses the relative frequency of real, false, and incomplete imprints and examines the diverse motives for false and incomplete imprints. They were employed by printers and publishers for many reasons besides hiding their identities to avoid recrimination from authors, the public, and publishers as well as from church and governmental authorities. Identifying silent and hidden printers by mastering ornament stocks and typographical fingerprints provides solid information on collaboration and division within the book trade. Particular attention is given to imprints employed in controversies during 1713, 1723, and 1733 and to the practices of printer-publisher George Faulkner, whose early false and incomplete imprints are listed in an appendix.

In: Reading Swift
Papers from the Fourth Münster Symposium on Jonathan Swift
Der Band enthält die sechsundzwanzig besten Vorträge des Vierten Münsteraner Symposiums zu Jonathan Swift vom Juni 2000. Thematisch ist der Band in sieben Sektionen gegliedert: I. Theoretical Concerns W. B. Carnochan, Stanford University Swift: The Canon, the Curriculum, and the Marketplace of Scholarship Clive T. Probyn, Monash University, Victoria “Convict of lyes is every sign”: Jonathan Swift and the Everyday II. Biographical Problems Bruce Arnold, Dublin Jonathan Swift: Some Current Biographical Problems Nora F. Crow, Smith Colleg, Northampton, Massachusetts Swift in Love J. A. Downie, Goldsmiths’ College, University of London “The Coffee Hessy spilt” and Other Issues in Swift’s Biography João Fróes, São Paulo, Brazil Swift’s Life in Late 1743: An Unpublished Letter from Deane Swift III. Political, Philosophical, and Literary Issues Ian Higgins, The Australian National University, Canberra Jonathan Swift and the Jacobite Diaspora Arno Löffler, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität, Erlangen-Nürnberg „Of Mean ans Great Figures“: Swift an dGreatness Michael De Porte, University of New Hapshire, Durham Riddles, Mysteries, and Lies: Swift and Secrecy Brean S. Hammond, Univeristy of Notthingham Swift’s Reading Heinz J. Vienken, Gernsbach „Nobody has ever written a really good book about Jonathan Swift“: Scouring the Recesses of Swiftian Mind
Papers from The Seventh Münster Symposium on Jonathan Swift
This new volume of Reading Swift assembles 26 lectures delivered at the Seventh Münster Symposium on Jonathan Swift in June 2017, testifying to an extraordinary spectrum of research interests in the Dean of St Patrick’s, Dublin, and his works. Reading Swift follows the tried and tested format of its predecessors, grouping the essays in eight sections: biographical problems; bibliographical and canonical studies; political and religious as well as philosophical, economic, and social issues; poetry; Gulliver’s Travels; and reception studies. The élan vital, which has been such a distinctive feature of Swift scholar-ship in the past thirty-five years, is continuing unabated.
Papers from The Sixth Münster Symposium on Jonathan Swift
Assembling thirty-five lectures delivered at the Sixth Münster Symposium on Jonathan Swift in June 2011, this new volume of Reading Swift testifies to an extraordinary spectrum of research interests in the Dean of St Patrick’s, Dublin, and his works. As in the successful earlier volumes, the essays have been grouped in eight sections: biographical aspects (W. B. Carnochan, John Irwin Fischer, Clive T. Probyn, Abigail Williams); bibliographical and textual studies (Ian Gadd, James E. May); A Tale of a Tub (J. A. Downie, Gregory Lynall and Marcus Walsh, Michael McKeon); historical and religious issues (Christopher J. Fauske, Christopher Fox, Ian Higgins, Ashley Marshall, Nathalie Zimpfer); Irish vistas (Sabine Baltes, Toby Barnard, Andrew Carpenter, D. W. Hayton, James Ward); poetry (Daniel Cook, Kirsten Juhas, Stephen Karian, Dirk F. Passmann and Hermann J. Real, James Woolley); Gulliver’s Travels (Barbara M. Benedict, Allan Ingram, Ann Cline Kelly, Melinda Alliker Rabb); and reception and adaptation (Gabriella Hartvig, Clement Hawes, Heinz-Joachim Müllenbrock, Tim Parnell, Peter Sabor, Nicholas Seager, Howard D. Weinbrot). Clearly, the élan vital, which has been such a distinctive feature of Swift scholarship in the past thirty years, is continuing unabated.